Boston’s Melting Pot: #ShareYourHope is Universal Across All Languages

Although Boston is the most historic city in the United States, people don’t just visit Boston for sightseeing alone. In fact, there are people who come here to study and look for the opportunity to fulfill the American dream.

There are more than a million international students studying at U.S. Colleges and Universities- with Boston being one of the top-ranking cities for its number of foreign students. With this reason, it’s no exaggeration to call Boston a melting pot made up of various unique cultures.

We hoped to see people from different cultures participating in our #ShareYourHope event, but we were more than surprised to see that more than 10 languages were written on the chalkboard. From English, Spanish, French to Korean, Japanese, Chinese and more. We couldn’t be happier to see so many people sharing their thoughts in their native languages. Here’s a look into our experience with the Melting Pot:

Mandarin

Other than English, Mandarin is the language that is most frequently represented. Perhaps this is because the majority of international students are from China, not to mention those from Taiwan and Hong-Kong.

1

From up to down, left to right, these mean “make a fortune,” “happiness,” “people,” “dream,” “Merry Christmas,” and “peace and joy.”

2

We think this is a Chinese character written in an ancient script that means “snow”, but we’re not 100% sure. If anyone knows what this means, please feel free to contact us. We appreciate your help!

Japanese

3

These two messages are tricky. They look like Chinese characters, but they are actually Japanese. They mean “smile” (upper) and “peace” (lower).

Korean

kik

It’s easy to recognize this is Korean but it’s hard to figure out what it means. The good thing is we have Korean friend that tells us this means “employment.”

Filipino

4

In case you’re wondering what is “Pagkain at Pamilya,” we can tell you it’s not English. It’s Filipino, and it means “food and family.”

French

5

Our friend from France shared that it’s his “lover and family” that got him through 2016. Another French friend hopes 2017 will be full of “love and peace” and still another is hoping to “have a child.”

Italian

6

It might not be hard to understand that this refers to “family,” but do you know which language it is? Well, it’s Italian. Isn’t it interesting that the word “family” is spelled similar in multiple romance languages?

Hebrew

7

8

Although these two are written differently, they both are Hebrew. One means “Israel” while the other one means “inner peace.”

Danish

9

What got our Danish friend through 2016 was “friends and beer” and their hope for 2017 is a “healthy family.”

Spanish

10

Our Spanish friend hopes to “be the best in everything.” What more could you want for the New Year?

Gaelic

11

In case you didn’t know, Gaelic is the Irish language. This message means “prosperity.”

Turkish

12

“Mücadele” means “struggle.” We all had some struggles in 2016 and that’s why we are hoping for a fresh start in the upcoming year.

Tamil

13

This one took us a while to figure out the language and meaning. Tamil is spoken by the Tamil people of India and Sri Lanka. This message refers to “love.”

Tibetan Script

14

We’ve done our best to translate every hope shared with us on the boards, but this message in particular was tricky to decode. After careful analysis and research, our team has identified it as Tibetan Script, with the simple message “Tibet.”

Arabic

15

This Arabic message is from one of the founders of IM Boston. He hopes 2017 is a year of “love, hope, and togetherness.”

Emoji

16

Thanks to the Internet, we have a universal language everyone will understand without further explanation, Emoji!

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